Brad Pitt’s Color Portrait

Presenting the portrait of Brad Pitt, the guy who once made women swoon as Achilles in “Troy“, who made death appear deliciously attractive in “Meet Joe Black“, and who mystified us as a reverse-aging human in “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.”
This portrait however, is of the Brad Pitt of today and it catches him looking older and a lot more distinguished. I was commissioned to do this portrait by a Brad Pitt Fan, and I didn’t have a choice in the matter of selecting the look, or I’d have picked Joe Black or Achilles. The requirement clearly stated that it should be a portrait of Brad Pitt of recent- and not yester-years.
Brad Pitt's Color Portrait - Poster in digital painting
About this Portrait:
This portrait has been painted in Photoshop. The actual size of the painting is 16.5 Inches x 25 Inches (Poster-size).
Here’s a close-up of the face.
Brad Pitt's color portrait (close up of face) painted using Photoshop cs6
A Portrait?!
Before this caricaturist was a caricaturist, for many long years, she was a portrait artist. Actually, any caricaturist worth his salt should be a good portrait artist too, because if you didn’t know the rules of facial/physical proportions, you wouldn’t know how to break them – and you can’t be a caricaturist without knowing which rules to break. In fact, most artists of all kinds begin their journey by drawing what they see around them, and only later they begin to experiment.
More later,

Caricature/Cartoon – The Witch, the Oracle, the Fortune-teller – they color our world.

This is…well, a sort of fan-toon art. Though I wasn’t consciously aiming to draw anyone when I drew her, I had just finished reading “Johnny & Marian” by B. G. Hope, and I think on a sub-conscious level, I was influenced by the characters in the book. You see, in this book there’s this witch, Samantha. She isn’t outright evil, but she enjoys casting her magical spells on unsuspecting men and women, making them exchange their bodies. While B.G. Hope’s novellas “Johnny & Marian” and “Ciaran and Harith” tell the story of Samantha’s victims and not of Samantha (a story that I wish would one day be told,) it’s Samantha who caught my imagination and made me draw this caricature. I won’t be surprised if I was under a spell the whole time I was drawing.

Ladies and Gentleman,
I present the caricature of the Witch, the Oracle, the Fortune-teller – inspired by Samantha the Witch, who actually is a lot more modern than this lady here – so in the spirit of “Mind your Language”…”a thousand apologies.”

The Caricature Cartoon Portrait Sketch Drawing of a Witch , Oracle, Fortune-teller, card-reader in color pencils.

They’ll get what they want…and deserve!
(Actual Size: 7″x9″)

If you are interested in unconventional urban fantasy please visit the following two links and find the novellas on Smashwords.

The author B. G. Hope doesn’t blog, but she sometimes writes on her friend BarbWire’s blog here.

 

Caricature/Cartoon – The Captive – Caught by Color Pencils!

So we humans got ahead in the rat-race and the rats got left behind. What if the rats revolted? What if they kidnapped humans and negotiated terms for their release?!

The last two weeks were busy, the next two weeks will be the same, but between these two stretches of busy days, I had a tiny oasis of two free days. I had bought some new color-pencils and I wanted to try them out. Some furious yet calming paper-scratching resulted in the birth of The Captive (below) and The Oracle (next post.)

The caricature of a blond man kidnapped by a mouse. The captor and the captive - a pencil color drawing.

“The Captive” – Actual Size: 5 inches by 7 inches.

So what is the rat saying to the man? What is the story in this picture?

You want to write one? Go ahead – be creative  – and if you do write one, please share the link.

Cover Art -The American Spectator Magazine July-August 2013 Issue.

I was earlier planning to post a caricature of Julia Gillard along with my story of why she resigned from her position as the Australian Prime-Minister, but when I received my copies of the American Spectator Magazine’s July-August issue, I couldn’t resist from sharing these pictures here.

Let me start by showing you the magazine.

The American Spectator Magazine Cover - July August 2013 Issue Cover Art - The Radio Family by Shafali Anand

The American Spectator – July-August Issue 2013 on my Desk. (Click to enlarge.)

The Story of the Cover’s Creation

When I heard from the magazine that they’d like me to do the cover for the July/Aug issue for them, I felt thrilled yet a bit anxious. A cover is, well, a COVER. I could live with having forgotten to paint those draw-strings on Red’s pajamas, but when an image is destined to become the cover of a magazine, it asks for a lot more dedication from the artist.

The requirement was – an American family of 1940s/50s, gathered around the radio. Sounds simple, right? Let us analyze.

An American family? That was easy. I am so completely into Hollywood movies, American News (CBS News is on my top-bar,) and American sitcoms that I often think of myself as a virtual American.

But an American family of 1940s/50s? I wasn’t even born in the 40s and 50s. In fact, my mom must have been a little girl back then. So, I had to research. I had to research the radio, the dresses, the toys, the papered walls, the floral couches, the pooch (who would’ve been a cocker-spaniel if my friend Nancy wouldn’t have told me that the middle-class family in those days would likely own a mutt and not a spainel,) and the colors that would make it look more like the 1940s.

So, upon receiving the requirement, I did my research, got it all into a sketch, and sent it over for approval. After they okayed it I began painting…and I did little more than paint for the next many many many hours. Eventually, a very tired, zombie-like me sent the artwork to the Magazine , plopped down on the bed and got ported to Atlantis. The next morning, I heard from them that they were happy with it. I took a small break from work and then returned to work on a Graphic-design project.

Then two days ago, I received the copies of the magazine. The cover looked even better than I thought it would. The Design team had done such a great job on it. The subtle, low-intensity colors in the Title, the subtitle, and the top and bottom bars integrate with the picture seamlessly. I was so happy when I looked at it that I decided to photograph it and post it along with the artwork.

Here’s the image closer up.

Cover Art for the American Spectator Magazine - July August 2013 Issue - The Radio family of 1940s - Shafali

I’ll return with Ms. Gillard’s story soon 🙂 Until then keep drawing to smile.