Karma the dog shares one of his pet peeves!

If you like dogs…

Ah well! That’s not the right way to begin. Let me try again.

If you like truthful dogs who don’t like to mince words…you’ll like Karma. I do:)

Here’s his pet peeve # 36!

The Cartoon of Comic dog Karma the K9Critic - dog, pup, canine, animal drawings.

Damn! I've got to undo what they've done!

Find Karma at the WiseK9’s blog here.

On the caricatures front, Mr. Holmes will find his way to this blog soon. I’ve also invited Charlie Sheen over and I can hear the sound of “winning” in the distance…he too should be here shortly.

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Presenting The Pen and Ink Portrait of Dewey Dewster, the Wire Fox Terrier with an Attitude!

I thought that the visitors to my blog shouldn’t be denied the opportunity of meeting Mr. Dewey Dewster, the magnificent Wire Fox Terrier, who works as a reporter in Petsburg, Pawsylvania. This gentle-dog gave me the opportunity to create his portrait in pen & ink. I sought his permission to present this portrait here, by writing to his Gram who obviously is his Personal Assistant as well – and he has given me a paws-up for it.
So, my dear visitors, MEET Mr. DEWEY DEWSTER, the Canine Reporter of Petsburg, the Hunter of the Vermin, and…the Detector of Porcupines (Ouch!), Turtles, and Rabbits!

Pen and Ink Pet Portrait Drawing of Dewey Dewster, the Terrier Pup

Dewey Dewster, the Fabulous Wire Fox Terrier from Petsburg Pawsylvania – Done in Pen and Ink – Approximate Size 7.5 inches by 8.5 inches.

A little about Dewey Dewster’s Portrait.

It’s done in Pen & Ink, on 120 gsm, acid-free, cartridge sheet in approximately 7.5 inches by 8.5 inches. Nancy had sent me a few high-resolution pictures for reference. I selected one of them as the main reference, and used others to understand Mr. Dewster’s features and personality. The important point to be noted here is that a Pen & Ink pet portrait is different from one that’s done either in oil, water, or pencils. You just can’t afford go wrong in a Pen & Ink drawing, because if you do, you can’t go back and make changes and so you’ve got to start again from scratch. Now that may not seem like a big thing, but imagine going wrong when you are putting the last stroke on the drawing!

Another important aspect of the drawing was that it was to be Dewey’s, and not ANY Wire Fox Terrier’s, portrait. A dog’s face is every bit as unique as a human face – and a pet’s portrait has to capture all that uniqueness, so that when the dog’s human friends look at the portrait, they see THEIR special dog.

I made some sketches, I looked at Dewey’s pictures again and again, and again…until I thought that I could look into his eyes and feel his furry paw in my hands, until I could feel my fingers run through his wirey fur, and until I could feel the silk of his delicate ears…and then I went out on the terrace, sat down against the wall with my drawing board on my knees, then with the soft rays of the December sun lighting up the drawing, I began to draw. Then I guess, I just went on drawing, until I saw Dewey smile at me from the drawing. His smile, half hidden in his magnificent silky beard, inspired me to draw in a cushion, and to give him a private corner of his own…

I would like to thank Dewey Dewster and Nancy Johanson for giving me this wonderful opportunity, and I will thank my own dog Oorvi for overcoming her jealousy and bearing with me:)

A little about this drawing.
It’s done using Pen & Ink on 120 gsm, acid-free, cartridge sheet in approximately 7.5 inches by 8.5 inches. Nancy had sent me a few high-resolution pictures for reference. I selected one of them as the main reference, and used others to understand Mr. Dewster’s features and personality. The important point to be noted here is that a Pen & Ink pet portrait is different from one that’s done either in oil, water, or pencils. You just can’t afford go wrong in a Pen & Ink drawing, because if you do, you can’t go back and make changes and so you’ve got to start again from scratch. Now that may not seem like a big thing, but imagine going wrong when you are putting the last stroke on the drawing!
Another important aspect of the drawing was that it was to be Dewey’s, and not ANY Wire Fox Terrier’s, portrait. A dog’s face is every bit as unique as a human face – and a pet’s portrait has to capture all that uniqueness, so that when the dog’s human friends look at the portrait, they see THEIR special dog.
I made some sketches, I looked at Dewey’s pictures again and again, and again…until I thought that I could look into his eyes and feel his furry paw in my hands, until I could feel my fingers run through his wirey fur, and until I could feel the silk of his delicate ears…and then I went out on the terrace, sat down against the wall with my drawing board on my knees, then with the soft rays of the December sun lighting up the drawing, I began to draw. Then I guess, I just went on drawing, until I saw Dewey smile at me from the drawing. His smile, half hidden in his magnificent silky beard, inspired me to draw in a cushion, and to give him a private corner of his own…
I would like to thank Dewey Dewster and Nancy Johanson for giving me this wonderful opportunity, and I will thank my own dog Oorvi for overcoming her jealousy and bearing with me:)