Shafali’s Caricatures on YouTube – Thank you Nancy!

I’d never have made it to YouTube.

I wouldn’t even have made a Slide Show – because I just don’t know how to…

And now, I don’t know how to thank Nancy (Dewey Dewster‘s Gram:-)) for creating this beautiful Slide-Show with my caricatures.

Nancy, it was the sweetest surprise I’ve got in a long-long time:) It is beautiful!

THANK YOU!

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Story-in-the-Caricature Blog Carnival Continues…

blog carnival story in the caricature

(This Storytelling Blog Carnival Ends on July 31, 2010.)

Hello Friends,

The Story-in-the-Caricature Blog Carnival continues. It will end on July 31, 2010.

Why? Because we intend to make it a monthly feature.

Every month, your favorite caricature blog will publish a caricature that will give you the yarn for your story.

The July 2010 Carnival already has three stories to tell:) Where’s yours?

  1. A Whale of a Tale by Dewey Dewster, the Pawsome Pawpawrazzi from Pawsylvania.
  2. Martha’s Revenge by Oorvi, the Management Guru.
  3. Come into the Garden Maude by Vivienne Tuffnell, the Author of the Beautiful Book, “Strangers and Pilgrims.”

So here’s the caricature, once again:) Give it a spin and write a story!

Caricature, cartoon, portrait of a woman with a spade for Story in a Caricature Blog Carnival.

What's her Story?

I say…what’s your story?

How to Draw the Caricature of Dr. Albert Einstein – the Greatest Scientist of the Twentieth Century

Dr. Albert Einstein’s caricature is among the easiest to draw. He has features that hanker for the caricaturist’s eyeballs. His hair, his nose, and his quirked-up eyebrows that push the skin of his forehead into those innumerable furrows and lines – all demand your attention. They leap out of his face and grab hold of your hand to make you draw them!

Caricature, Cartoon, Portrait, Drawing of Albert Einstein, the greatest mind of the twentieth century, who won a nobel prize for his discovery of the photoelectric effect.

Why? I wonder.

Excellent. So his face isn’t like Jack Nicholson’s (with a signboard that says, “everything you see, you can caricature for 99 cents”,) nor is it like George Clooney’s (a treasure hunt in a Martian desert.) Einstein’s face is somewhere between that of these two. It tempts you to fetch your pencil and your drawing pad as the three prominent features in his face are really, madly prominent!

I discussed the folly of trying to caricature “everything” in the previous tutorial, “How to Draw the Caricature of Jack Nicholson – The Wolf.” Listening to my own advice (yes, unlike many, I trust my own advice,) I decided to exaggerate the following features.

  • The Hair
  • The forehead with one brow quirked-up
  • The Nose

The first step in creating any drawing is to…begin, and so I began. When I draw faces, I draw the eyes first, and those eyes watch me draw. This can be an especially unnerving experience when the person watching you draw is Dr. Albert Einstein! I kept my cool, avoided his assessing glare, and continued to sketch. After drawing in the eyes, I moved to the nose, and then to the lips…his eyes continued to follow my pencil, everywhere.

After a while, I gave up, and looked straight into his eyes, and then I realized that there was more to Einstein than his face. I began to remember what I had read of his life. Einstein was known for his brain. He was thought to have been born with a bigger brain.

Lo and Behold! If the expression sounds archaic, please excuse me – for I am (archaic) too.

So…once again…

Lo and Behold! I decided to exaggerate the size of his forehead!

Here is how the caricature was created.

Caricaturing Einstein’s Eyes and Brows

Check out any picture of Einstein, he’s got a bemused look on his face. He seems to be looking at world and saying, “It can all be explained through the General Principle of Relativity.” So I pushed up his quirky eyebrow a tad more to exaggerate the look.

Caricaturing Einstein’s Nose

Einstein’s nose isn’t one of those razor-sharp, slice-n-dice kind of nose. It’s a soft, round, and bulbous nose – a little longer than the normal. All this makes the nose-bulb(?) look like it’s experiencing the full force of gravity!

(Dear Sir Isaac Newton, I hope that you and Dr. Einstein get along well in heaven, and both of you along with Dr. John Wheeler, use the quantum foam to stay in touch with the scientists of our time. I assure you, they need your help to clean up the BP Oil Spill Mess!)

Oh, the nose! As you can surmise, I wanted the nose to become longer, and its bulb to become more bulbous; so I pulled the lower anchor points out of the feature frame, until the nose overshot the lips. (To understand anchor points and feature frame, read “The Evolution of a Caricaturist“.)

Caricaturing Einstein’s Hair

Einstein’s hair is magnificent. It’s white, long, and fluffy (he used a shampoo that he invented himself – right?) I added the effect of the electric hair blower on the white, long, and fluffy, to make them more prominent.

I also fluffed up Einstein’s mustache and tweaked it a little at the ends:)

Caricaturing Einstein’s Forehead

Inspired by Dr. Einstein’s supervising eyes, I made his forehead and also his head, bigger. Remember that the head is almost hemispherical. I decided to exaggerate not the size of the hemisphere, but its shape! Look at the forehead closely and try to visualize the head – you’ll “see” that the shape tends to be a sphere more than a hemisphere.

Einstein’s forehead has a lot of prominent lines. I exaggerated the lines. Look at the right edge of the forehead – you can even see the folds. When your exaggeration moves out of the facial space (at the edges) it becomes stronger.

That was all I did – and Einstein’s caricature winked at me:) My job was done!

If you are interested in exploring the techniques involved in drawing caricatures further, I recommend the following:

Have fun caricaturing:-) Spread the Smile!

The Caricaturist – Behind-the-Scene, The Caricature Drawing Book, The Upcoming Celebrity Caricatures and Calendars, and Permission to Use Shafali’s Caricatures.

Dear Readers and Visitors,

Thanks for visiting:) Without visitors no blogger can remain charged – especially not the artistic kind! Your visits are the source of my motivation – your smiles inspire me to do better.

This is a personal post, so if you are looking for caricatures, feel free to skip this. The whole idea behind this post is to tell the serious followers of this blog about the behind-the-scene going-ons.

News – The Book – The Evolution of a Caricaturist!

Do you want the good news first or the bad?
Let’s look at it like this – if you know that all you can have is burnt bread and delicious cake, and if you have to eat both, which would you like to eat first?

Ah…I knew. So here’s the burnt bread!
Some of you know that I am writing a book and publishing it on Google Knol. I’ve already published four chapters, but due to some non-artistic back-breaking work on the personal front, I haven’t been able to publish the fifth chapter so far (I intended to add the chapters on a weekly-basis.)

Now the delicious, aromatic cake.
The good news is that the book is half-complete. I’ve written 9 chapters in my notebook! By the end of next week, you will be able to read two more chapters:-)

About the Celebrity Calendars…

I’ve already added the Celebrity Calendars and many of my dear readers have downloaded them – thanks! The Celeb-Calendars shall be added once a month.

About the Upcoming Caricatures…

George Clooney and Julia Roberts will be appearing on your favorite caricature blog very soon! Do return for your share of smiles:)

And…About the Permission to Use Shafali’s Caricatures:-)

I’d also like to re-state that unless specifically stated, all caricatures on this blog can be used by you for any non-commercial purpose. Let’s understand this –

You’ve got a blog/website and you feel that one of these caricatures could add value to your post – go ahead use it. Just don’t change the image or remove the copyright information given on the borders. This way it’s a win-win for both of us:-)

Spread the Smile!